About

Sherrie Russell-Brown is an international lawyer, who has litigated before the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR), in the case of Juvénal Kajelijeli, authored articles on international labor rights, international criminal law, international humanitarian law, mass atrocities (see also A U.N. Solution to A Problem from Hell, Review Essay, Samantha Power, A PROBLEM FROM HELL: AMERICA AND THE AGE OF GENOCIDE) and transitional justice, presented on issues of law and security, child soldiers in armed conflict and international child protection and conducted international labor rights advocacy training and field research, in the Kingdom of Swaziland.

In her commitment to international justice and human rights, Ms. Russell-Brown continues in her family’s tradition of service to the community. Ms. Russell-Brown’s great-grandfather, Dr. Julius Graham, was one of the co-founders of the earliest African-American-owned and operated hospitals in Detroit, Michigan – – Dunbar/Parkside and Fairview. He emigrated from Jamaica, West Indies, in 1919, graduated from Wilberforce University and Meharry Medical College, was a Trustee of Wilberforce and President of the Detroit Medical Society.

And, her cousin Mrs. Patsy Robertson is a Visiting Professor, The Policy Institute, King’s College London, Chair of the Ramphal Institute and the former Director of Information at the Commonwealth Secretariat and Official Spokesperson for the Commonwealth (1983-1994), senior Media Advisor for the Fourth World Conference on Women and Beijing +5, and with UNICEF on the UN General Assembly Special Session on Children 1991-1992. She is also a Chair of Widows’ Rights International and The Commonwealth Association, and is a trustee of several charities, including The Thomson Foundation and The British Empire & Commonwealth Museum.

Ms. Russell-Brown graduated from Columbia Law School (JD, 1992), Harlan Fiske Stone Scholar, where she was a member of the Child Advocacy Clinic, a Teaching Fellow in Constitutional Law, Writing and Research Editor, Human Rights Law Review and received a Charles Evans Hughes Fellowship, awarded for showing “demonstrated concern for the legal problems of the disadvantaged and active involvement in helping disadvantaged people while a member of the Law School community.”

She served as a Federal Judicial Law Clerk for the Honorable Earl Ben Gilliam, United States District Court for the Southern District of California, before becoming a Litigation Associate in the New York Office of Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison, where she also coordinated Paul, Weiss’ participation in the “Legal Outreach” program, which introduces junior high and high school students to the operation of the legal system.

Returning to Columbia Law School, Ms. Russell-Brown graduated with an LL.M. (1999) in international human rights law, Harlan Fiske Stone Scholar, and received a Post-Graduate Fellowship in the Law School’s Human Rights Institute. She later entered academia, teaching “Public International Law,” “International Organizations,” “International Law & State Behavior” and “War Crimes, Genocide, Terrorism and International Criminal Law” and most recently “Human Rights” in the Roosevelt House Public Policy Institute at Hunter College (see Hunter College Student Evaluations Fall 2014). And, although Ms. Russell-Brown has not completed her D.Phil at the University of Oxford, her thesis research is on Reservations to Normative/Law-Making Multilateral Treaties in International Law, and, in particular, human rights treaties.

You can also find Sherrie Russell-Brown on the web at: LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, WordPressabout.me, Pinterest, Martindale Hubbell, Google+, Quora, PlaxoWikipedia and ResearchGate.

 

View Sherrie Russell-Brown's profile on LinkedIn

 

Advertisements

8 Comments on “About

  1. Pingback: Africa in Transition » The Rescued Chibok Girl and the Victims Support Fund

  2. Pingback: The Rescued Chibok Girl and the Victims Support Fund » Nigeria Local News| About Nigeria | Naira news

  3. Pingback: Africa in Transition » Caught in the Crossfire: What Future for Women and Children in Nigeria’s Forgotten Crisis

  4. Pingback: Caught in the Crossfire: What Future for Women and Children in Nigeria’s Forgotten Crisis

  5. Pingback: Caught in the Crossfire: What future for women, children in Nigeria’s forgotten crisis – News Board

  6. Pingback: Caught in the Crossfire: What future for women, children in Nigeria’s forgotten crisis - Screammie

  7. Pingback: Caught in the Crossfire: What future for women, children in Nigeria’s forgotten crisis - Top Nigeria News

  8. Pingback: Africa in Transition » The Oslo Humanitarian Conference on Nigeria and the Lake Chad Region

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: